Amigas Day
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The Azorean tradition of celebrating Amigas Day, dedicated to Amigas (female friends), and Amigos (male friends), Compadres (male buddies) and Comadres (female buddies) too, is thought to have started in the early 20th century, when village people would get together to “make the evening” (spend the evening together), many times preparing the wheat and other grains they would need for the Holy Spirit Festas. During these evenings, they would sing songs and recite poems about friendship.

In time, the tradition became associated with the four weeks before Carnival, that is, the four Thursdays before Mardi Gras (the French term meaning literally “Fat Tuesday,” the day before Ash Wednesday). Each year, the first Thursday is Amigos Day, the second is Amigas Day, the third is Compadres Day, and the fourth is Comadres Day. This is an Azorean tradition that has become increasingly popular among all age groups.

During the 35 years that I lived in the United States among our immigrant communities, I don’t recall ever hearing about this tradition, which I was delighted to discover now that I live in São Miguel Island. Enchanted with the custom, I have organized a yearly luncheon for 12 Amigas since 2012. We talk and laugh, tell jokes, sing songs and play games, enjoy our meal and share our friendship.

During this time, we have lost two big Amigas, colleagues of mine at the University of the Azores: Fátima Sequeira Dias, who left us in early 2013, and Ana Isabel Neto, who departed in 2021. Both were the life of the party; both are sorely missed; both remain in our hearts.


Fátima Sequeira Dias
(1958-2013)

2018





2019









2020





Ana Isabel Neto
(1977-2021)
Related
Amigas Day
Back

The Azorean tradition of celebrating Amigas Day, dedicated to Amigas (female friends), and Amigos (male friends), Compadres (male buddies) and Comadres (female buddies) too, is thought to have started in the early 20th century, when village people would get together to “make the evening” (spend the evening together), many times preparing the wheat and other grains they would need for the Holy Spirit Festas. During these evenings, they would sing songs and recite poems about friendship.

In time, the tradition became associated with the four weeks before Carnival, that is, the four Thursdays before Mardi Gras (the French term meaning literally “Fat Tuesday,” the day before Ash Wednesday). Each year, the first Thursday is Amigos Day, the second is Amigas Day, the third is Compadres Day, and the fourth is Comadres Day. This is an Azorean tradition that has become increasingly popular among all age groups.

During the 35 years that I lived in the United States among our immigrant communities, I don’t recall ever hearing about this tradition, which I was delighted to discover now that I live in São Miguel Island. Enchanted with the custom, I have organized a yearly luncheon for 12 Amigas since 2012. We talk and laugh, tell jokes, sing songs and play games, enjoy our meal and share our friendship.

During this time, we have lost two big Amigas, colleagues of mine at the University of the Azores: Fátima Sequeira Dias, who left us in early 2013, and Ana Isabel Neto, who departed in 2021. Both were the life of the party; both are sorely missed; both remain in our hearts.


Fátima Sequeira Dias
(1958-2013)

2018





2019









2020





Ana Isabel Neto
(1977-2021)
Related
Amigas Day

The Azorean tradition of celebrating Amigas Day, dedicated to Amigas (female friends), and Amigos (male friends), Compadres (male buddies) and Comadres (female buddies) too, is thought to have started in the early 20th century, when village people would get together to “make the evening” (spend the evening together), many times preparing the wheat and other grains they would need for the Holy Spirit Festas. During these evenings, they would sing songs and recite poems about friendship.

In time, the tradition became associated with the four weeks before Carnival, that is, the four Thursdays before Mardi Gras (the French term meaning literally “Fat Tuesday,” the day before Ash Wednesday). Each year, the first Thursday is Amigos Day, the second is Amigas Day, the third is Compadres Day, and the fourth is Comadres Day. This is an Azorean tradition that has become increasingly popular among all age groups.

During the 35 years that I lived in the United States among our immigrant communities, I don’t recall ever hearing about this tradition, which I was delighted to discover now that I live in São Miguel Island. Enchanted with the custom, I have organized a yearly luncheon for 12 Amigas since 2012. We talk and laugh, tell jokes, sing songs and play games, enjoy our meal and share our friendship.

During this time, we have lost two big Amigas, colleagues of mine at the University of the Azores: Fátima Sequeira Dias, who left us in early 2013, and Ana Isabel Neto, who departed in 2021. Both were the life of the party; both are sorely missed; both remain in our hearts.


Fátima Sequeira Dias
(1958-2013)

2018





2019









2020





Ana Isabel Neto
(1977-2021)
Related